HEROs Give a Voice to Foster Care Solutions

HEROs Give a Voice to Foster Care Solutions
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Foster youth participate in a workshop.
Foster youth participate in a two-day Helping Everyone/Each Other Reach Out (HERO) workshop in Charleston, WV.
A foster care consultant speaks to caregivers and staff.
Foster care consultant Dan Martin speaks to caregivers and staff during a breakout session for adults.

Foster care can be a lonely and confusing experience, especially as youth approach adulthood and prepare to age out of the system. To help ease concerns, Aetna Better Health of West Virginia and KVC Health Systems held the first Helping Everyone/Each Other Reach Out (HERO) foster youth workshop in Charleston, West Virginia.

The two-day powerful workshop focused on equipping and empowering teens with the tools and resources they will need to navigate the transition safely and effectively. It featured sessions on building relationships, identifying social supports for housing, food security and employment, and preparing for life without a guardian. Attendees learned how vulnerability, courage and worthiness can lead to opportunities, bravery and pride in one’s self.

Advancing our social determinants of health efforts and reducing social isolation

Like our recently announced “Destination: Health” platform, the workshop advances our efforts to build healthier communities by positively impacting social determinants of health — those economic and social factors outside a doctor’s office affecting our health.

According to Frank Angotti, Aetna Better Health of West Virginia’s medical director, “The workshop’s goal was to expand the meaningful connections young foster children have in the community, with the hope of reducing the health risks associated with long-term social isolation.”

Scientific research 1,2 shows that social isolation leads to negative health behaviors, negative health conditions and increased health care utilization, including:

  • A 25-30 percent increased risk of mortality (Holt-Lunstad 2015)Hold-Lundstad (2015). Loneliness and social isolation are just as much a threat to longevity as obesity. Science Daily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150311160521.htm

  • Loneliness has been equated to the effects of smoking 15 cigarettes a day (Holt-Lunstad 2010)Holt-Lundstad (2015). Relationships improve your odds of survival by 50 percent, research finds. Science Daily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100727174909.htm

Peer training inspires foster youth

Foster care consultant Dan Martin, a former manager with Child Protection Services in Ontario, Canada, modeled the workshops after the Family Finding strategy associated with the National Institute for Permanent Family Connectedness. The HERO program has grown throughout the US, Canada and other countries with positive results for foster youth and their families.

Peers, made up of former foster youth who’ve previously trained with the HERO program in Canada, led the workshop and inspired the attendees to develop their own personal networks — ones that will provide them with the support they need to have a lifetime of connectivity to the people they care about and those who care about them.

Peer facilitator Alisia Johnson shared with the group, “A year ago you would never have found me in front of a group running a workshop like this. I have really grown in my confidence.”

Both the West Virginia foster youth and visiting peers made an instant connection. Having the opportunity to share common experiences gave these teens a platform to voice their ideas. Together they were able to talk about solutions to many of the challenges found in foster care.

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

About Aetna Better Health® of West Virginia

Aetna Better Health of West Virginia uses an integrated model to address the behavioral health and medical needs of its Medicaid membership. This biopsychosocial model recognizes the strong correlation between physical and mental health and the impact of trauma on members’ health and life trajectory. In addition, a person-centered approach allows care management staff to cultivate relationships with members and their families, caregivers, providers, advocates, peer and family organizations and community groups to meet members where they are. The payoff to members comes in the form of increased quality of care and quality of life.

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Safe Medication Disposal Program Expands in Ohio

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Our new Ohio disposal units were rolled out at a recent event at a CVS Pharmacy in Toledo, which was attended by city officials, including Toledo Mayor Wade Kapszukiewicz (far left) and Police Chief George Kral (far right).

Our enterprise-wide efforts to help prevent the misuse and abuse of opioids nationwide include making safe disposal options for unused or unwanted medications readily accessible to all of our CVS Pharmacy customers.

That’s why we’re working to expand our safe medication disposal program to more locations nationwide, include, most recently, in Ohio, where we added disposal units in 53 CVS Pharmacy stores in communities across the state, including Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Toledo and Youngstown.

“When patients leave unused medications, especially opioids, in a medicine cabinet, there is a risk that those medications might be misused or diverted, which is why we have worked to help increase access to and awareness of safe medication disposal options in the communities we serve,” said William Cuffari, R.Ph., and District Leader for CVS Pharmacy. “Providing more options for the proper disposal of unused medications is just one of the ways that CVS Health is working to help combat opioid misuse, in Ohio and across the country.”

This most recent expansion brings the total disposal units in CVS Pharmacy stores in Ohio to 82. Nationwide, we’ve installed more than 1,300 in-store safe medication disposal units, and donated more than 970 units to community organizations like police departments.

We will continue to roll out additional safe medication disposal units across the country through the end of 2019, as part of a commitment announced at the end of last year to help provide more disposal options in our communities. We’ve also partnered with Google Maps to make it easier for consumers to find year-round medication disposal options.

Our safe medication disposal program is just one of many ways we’re working with local communities to help prevent and address prescription misuse. Our Pharmacists Teach program brings CVS pharmacists to schools across the country to talk to students and parents about the dangers of prescription drug abuse. More than 500,000 students across the country, including over 19,000 in Ohio, have participated in the program.

We’ve worked with 48 states including Ohio and Washington, DC to increase access to the opioid overdose-reversal drug naloxone, also known as Narcan. Patients can obtain this potentially life-saving medication, which can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose, without an individual prescription in these states.

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

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Aetna Brings Doctor ‘House Call’ Service to Metro Atlanta

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As consumers drive transformational change in health care, Aetna is responding by making the health care experience easier through connected health systems, services and digital tools to help simplify care for members and their families.

The latest example is in Atlanta, where Aetna is offering members another simple, convenient, and local care option. Heal, the market leader in doctor house calls, has joined Aetna’s robust network of high-quality providers in the metro Atlanta area, including Gwinnett, Forsyth, Fulton, Cobb, DeKalb, and Clayton counties.

Effective immediately, Aetna Commercial members in Atlanta can schedule house calls with pediatricians, internists and family practice physicians for the same co-pay as a primary care doctor’s office visit. Between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., seven days a week, 365 days a year, a patient can be seen by a Heal doctor at their home, office, or location of choice within two hours with the touch of an app.

“We like the simplicity and convenience of this new service option for our Commercial members,” said Frank Ulibarri, Aetna’s market president in Georgia. “Our offering with Heal reflects Aetna’s commitment to creating a more accessible, simple and patient-centric health care experience.”

This is Heal’s second major market launch. The company has provided 100,000 house calls across California and the Washington, D.C. area in less than four years, reducing unnecessary Emergency Room and Urgent Care visits by up to 71 percent and generating more than $62 million in healthcare cost savings.

“We’re eager to work with Aetna in metro Atlanta to continue the success we’ve experienced in other markets,” said Nick Desai, co-founder and CEO at Heal. “Heal and Aetna share the same dedication and vision to transforming health care in our local communities, particularly for patients with the greatest need.”

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Teaming Up to Provide Vision Care to Chicago Students

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Aetna and OneSight partnered with CPS to offer free eye exams and eyeglasses to hundreds of Chicago students.

Nearly 90 percent of Chicago Public Schools (CPS) students screened on the first day of a vision clinic provided by Aetna and OneSight – the leading global vision care nonprofit organization – were identified as needing vision correction.

As part of our efforts to engage people with the care they need, when they need it, Aetna and OneSight partnered with CPS to offer free eye exams and eyeglasses to hundreds of CPS students, who would otherwise have limited or no access to vision care.

Glasses were manufactured onsite, allowing students from Youth Connection Charter School – Truman Middle College and the Truman College Child Development Lab School to receive their pair the next day. Roughly, 12,000 adult students from the largest English as a Second Language and GED programs in Illinois were also eligible to use the clinic.

“We have a district of over 361,000 students, many with vision related needs and our school-based/school-linked vision exam program helps us eliminate poor vision as a barrier to learning,” said D. Kenneth L. Fox, Chicago Public Schools chief health officer.

Clear sight helps students comprehend and learn up to twice as much, increasing productivity by 35 percent and reducing dropout rates by 44 percent, according to a study by OneSight and Deloitte. Aetna’s partnership with OneSight will serve this vulnerable student population and help raise community awareness about the importance of vision care.

“At least 60 percent of our overall health comes from our social and physical environment, or social determinants of health, which play an important role in how young people grow and thrive,” said Jerome Dioguardi, vice president, Aetna dental and vision. “We are happy to support an effort that contributes to vision wellness.”

More than 55,000 CPS students have minimal to no access to optometry and ophthalmology services. Vision changes can occur without a child or parent noticing them, and students should have their eyes examined annually, or more frequently if recommended by an eye doctor.

“Our fight for clear sight is essentially a fight for human potential,” said Janet Duke, clinic manager at OneSight. “We have hosted over 900 charitable clinics and are happy to bring this experience to Chicago Public School students.”

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Jersey Cares Launches Fitness Initiative in Newark

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More than 30 Aetna and CVS employees volunteered alongside Sussex Avenue students.
More than 30 Aetna and CVS employees volunteered alongside Sussex Avenue students.
The Health in the Community Initiative will directly impact students across three Essex County elementary schools.
The Health in the Community Initiative will directly impact students across three Essex County elementary schools.
More than 30 Aetna and CVS employees volunteered alongside Sussex Avenue students.
More than 30 Aetna and CVS employees volunteered alongside Sussex Avenue students.
More than 30 Aetna and CVS employees volunteered alongside Sussex Avenue students.
More than 30 Aetna and CVS employees volunteered alongside Sussex Avenue students.

Aetna Foundation grant funds healthy initiative for students

With a $250,000 grant from the Aetna Foundation, Jersey Cares, a nonprofit organization committed to creating impactful projects that address critical community-identified needs, launched the Health in the Community Initiative at Sussex Avenue Renew School in Newark, New Jersey. This innovative experiential learning program encourages a culture of health in schools by providing nutrition and fitness education for kindergarten through fifth-grade students.

The Health in the Community Initiative will directly impact students across three Essex County elementary schools with extended benefits to families and peers. Key aspects of the program include the building of greenhouses and gardens at each school, providing onsite gardening programs to instruct the students on the importance of healthy eating, as well as creating enhanced outdoor spaces to encourage active play as classroom and activity-based fitness workshops are provided.

“Health in the Community is a ground-up program that will be evolved through the participation of parents, guardians, teachers, and school leaders, built with the incredibly generous support of the Aetna Foundation and powered by the intention to give children a real, sustainable likelihood of a healthy and brighter future,” said Brian Dean, President and CEO of Jersey Cares. “This initiative is a compelling opportunity to demonstrate what all of us can accomplish by working together as individuals and as organizations.”

The Aetna Foundation, a philanthropic arm of CVS Health, presented the check to Jersey Cares and kicked off the initiative by having more than 30 Aetna and CVS employees volunteer alongside Sussex Avenue students in activities that included raised garden bed assembly, a fit and fun exercise workshop, and school library organization.

For 25 years Jersey Cares has worked to address social determinants that affect the health outcomes of students in Newark Public Elementary schools, helping hundreds of nonprofits recruit and develop volunteers. They expanded their program offering in 2006 to engage nearly 2,000 volunteers and gave slightly over 4,000 hours of service to programs that engaged more than 26,000 volunteers to produce over 89,000 hours of service last year.

“At CVS Health, we know that the path to good health starts locally in our schools and homes. Today we are excited to have the opportunity to work collaboratively with the team at Jersey Cares on this important initiative with the Newark school system,” said Dr. Garth Graham, President of the Aetna Foundation. “The Health in the Community Initiative is an innovative project that will give students and their families’ access to the tools they need to make good decisions when it comes to nutrition and fitness, critical components to establishing long-lasting health and wellness.”

The Aetna Foundation grant to Jersey Cares builds upon the tradition of community investment by CVS Health and Aetna and advances our purpose of helping people on their path to better health. Learn more about the Health in the Community project, here: https://www.jerseycares.org/.

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Project Health expanding free health screenings as part of Building Healthier Communities

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Garth Graham, vice president of Community Health and Impact, CVS Health, announces the expansion of Project Health’s free health screenings in the Sacramento area.

About 60 percent of life expectancy is driven by behavioral, social and environmental factors including family, education, housing, and access to fresh food. To improve patient engagement and outcomes within our communities, CVS Health has expanded its annual Project Health free health screening campaign to the Sacramento area. Over the next two months, CVS Health will offer 32 free health screening events across area CVS Pharmacy locations.

With no appointment necessary, community members will have access to preventive screenings including blood pressure, body mass index, glucose and cholesterol, to help identify chronic conditions before they become life-threatening illnesses. Once screened, patients can consult with on-site bilingual nurse practitioners or physician assistants to discuss their results and those requiring additional follow up care will be referred to no-cost or low-cost medical facilities or to their primary care physician.

Earlier this year, following its completed acquisition of Aetna, CVS Health announced the Building Healthier Communities initiative, a $100 million commitment to making community health and wellness central to the newly combined company’s charge for a better world.

“CVS Health is committed to expanding access to quality and affordable care, both through our retail footprint and with national and local non-profits and organizations who share our belief that better health starts at the community level,” said Garth Graham (pictured at right), vice president of Community Health and Impact, CVS Health. “We are thrilled to be here today in Sacramento celebrating the expansion of Project Health and look forward to providing local residents with free health screenings over the next two months as part of our commitment to building healthier communities.”

The event also included the presentation of a $75,000 grant from the CVS Health Foundation to the Sacramento Native American Health Center to help expand opioid treatment options locally.

Project Health has delivered more than $127 million in free health care services to nearly 1.7 million people in multicultural communities with a large number of uninsured or underinsured Americans. Sacramento is one of five cities in California where a total of 256 Project Health screenings will take place this year. Events are also occurring in Los Angeles, and took place earlier this year in Fresno and San Francisco. Project Health will be coming to the San Diego area in July, and to additional markets this fall.

For more details on Project Heath, read the press release or visit www.cvs.com/projecthealth (in Spanish: www.cvs.com/proyectosalud).

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Aetna Sponsors Third Annual Opioid Forum in DeKalb County

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Larry Johnson, National Association of Counties Chairman of the Large Urban County Caucus, speaking during the recent opioid summit in Georgia.
Larry Johnson, National Association of Counties Chairman of the Large Urban County Caucus, speaking during the recent opioid summit in Georgia.
Frank Ulibarri, Georgia and Gulf States market president, spoke at the event.
Frank Ulibarri, Georgia and Gulf States market president, spoke at the event.

As national efforts continue to combat opioid use disorder (OUD), the Aetna Georgia Markets team is committed to supporting their local community.

These efforts were showcased in the third annual DeKalb County Opioid Summit – where the focus was on ways to help youth and families in the county overcome the challenges of OUD.

Aetna, a CVS Health company, sponsored the May 2 summit. The event highlighted the local impacts of this health issue and Aetna’s commitment to help at the local level. The event featured youth from local high schools, stakeho­­­­lders and community leaders.

This diverse group of stakeholders discussed the opioid epidemic from their perspective, bringing to light the negative aspects they see daily and the opportunities to improve the situation in DeKalb and for the state. Frank Ulibarri, Georgia and Gulf States market president, represented Aetna.

The local impacts of the crisis

In 2013, Antoinette Tuff found herself held hostage as a bookkeeper in a local school in Georgia but was able to disarm the gunman by talking him into surrendering to the police. After that experience, Tuff founded Kids on the Move for Success, which is an organization dedicated to helping children see the positive in life.

“No matter what it looks like today, it will be better tomorrow,” said Huff, who spoke at the summit. “Kids today face so much and are more likely to turn to drugs to feel better or to escape. This epidemic is not in some distant land, it’s in our front yards and we need to deal with it.”

For panelist Robin Elliot, working to solve the abuse of opioids is her life’s mission.

The death of Elliott’s son from a heroin overdose has made her become an advocate in Georgia. Elliott’s organization GA Overdose Prevention has dispensed over 1,000 Narcan kits across Georgia to help those who may experience an overdose. She’s also worked to pass a Georgia law that prohibits any legal action against someone who may have overdosed (from any substance).

Hyancinth Douglas, a juvenile probation supervisor and youth advocate, talked about how teenagers need to find positive support in their teachers, mentors and family members and reach out to them.

“Educate yourself about drugs,” said Douglas. “Try to determine what triggers you, and use your support system to help. There is no shame here.”

In a workshop hosted by CVS Health, two pharmacists outlined the real threat that opioids pose to the community and the entire country.

In a packed classroom, the pharmacists cautioned that adolescents are at an increased risk for addiction since their brains are still developing.

Ulibarri said he was proud to again be a part of this meaningful event.

“We are honored to once again collaborate on the third annual forum of this kind in DeKalb County,” said Ulibarri. “As a fellow Georgian, I’m proud of Aetna’s mission to help people on their path to better health – including the time and resources that have been dedicated to tackling the most-pressing issues facing the communities where we live and work. Working together with DeKalb County and other local stakeholders, we’re able to explore the impact of OUD on our youth and families and to discuss how to best combat it. It is ultimately on all of us to act.”

Aetna is committed to combatting OUD with a multifaceted strategy focused on preventing prescription opioid misuse and addiction, intervening in at-risk behavior, and supporting members with access to treatment for addiction. For more information on our efforts, click here. Similarly, CVS Health has made an enterprise-wide commitment to help address prescription opioid use disorder by designing programs to increase access to safe medication disposal, encourage appropriate utilization, educate patients and communities, expand access to life-saving overdose reversal agents, and support local recovery programs. For more information on those efforts, click here.

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A Creative Collaboration; The United Way and Aetna Launch Venture Fund

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The United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley, in collaboration with Aetna, held the first-ever Venture Fund competition. The “Shark Tank” style pitch event was held in Boston on May 22, 2019, with a focus on seeding new, innovative and collaborative solutions to further the finalist organization’s social missions.

An expert panel of judges and the broader community selected four winners out of eight finalists – who will be awarded up to $75,000 to implement their initiatives with a one-year grant. This progressive community impact program selected the winners after they pitched their ideas live on issues including family homelessness, school readiness and the need for skilled workers. The winners chosen were: Urban College of Boston, FamilyAid Boston, Lawrence CommunityWorks and Our Neighbors Table.

This collaboration is designed to approach a significant problem in a new way. Communities that have access to housing, jobs and career support have healthier residents because consumer health is affected by more than access to healthcare. This is why Aetna is working hard to bring additional resources into the community which will improve health ambitions. This Venture Fund competition supports the holistic long-term vision of achieving lasting change.

“Health starts in the community, and the most innovative solutions to help improve community health are often developed by individuals and organizations that experience these issues firsthand on a daily basis,” said Leila Nowroozi, Aetna Business Strategy. “We are committed to supporting community-based groups that address social determinants of health. The grants from the United Way Venture Fund will give these organizations additional resources to make greater impact and generate data so that we can all learn from their best practices.”

Michael K. Durkin, President and Chief Executive Officer at United Way said “we know that together, we can do more than any one organization can do alone.” Additionally, they were “looking for partnerships and collaborations among existing organizations that are shovel ready and focused on creating financial opportunity and ensuring educational success for people in need in our region.”

Visit the website of the United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley for more information on the winners and the rest of the finalists.

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Aetna Better Health of Florida Supports Food Pantry Conference

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For millions of Americans, hunger is a constant reminder of food insecurity and the challenges they face from it on a daily basis. To win the war on hunger, food banks and their partners understand that one way to solve it is to ease the stigma associated with food assistance programs.

To fight back against this stigma, Aetna Better Health® of Florida (ABHFL), a Medicaid Managed Care Plan, in partnership with the Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida, recently sponsored their annual Partnership Networking Conference in the city of Orlando with a $10,000 donation. The conference brought together over 300 partner agencies and local organizations whose main mission is to distribute healthy foods to needy families in Central Florida. These agencies distribute food at the neighborhood level and partnering with them is a great way to meet Medicaid members where they are. ABHFL was the first Medicaid health plan ever invited to attend this annual conference.

During the conference, there were several speakers addressing the issue of food insecurity and community outreach, including RJ Briscione, senior director, Aetna Medicaid Business Development. RJ discussed Aetna’s work on social determinants of health and food insecurity at the local level, including how the health plan serves Medicaid members in Central Florida.

According to RJ, “With the help of dedicated partners like Second Harvest, Aetna Better Health aims to raise awareness and understanding of the complex issues related to food insecurity, and to develop effective strategies to combat hunger and the health effects that come with it.”

“The conference also provided the health plan a unique opportunity to network with food pantry providers and distribute ABHFL promotional items,” said Carl Lee, ABHFL manager of Community Development and Outreach. “We were able to hand out ABHFL branded posters for attendees to display at their agency locations. Participants praised our presence at the conference and complemented us for being good stewards to the community.”

About Aetna Better Health of Florida

Aetna Better Health of Florida uses an integrated physical and behavioral health approach to the administration of benefits for the Medicaid Managed Care, Florida Healthy Kids, and Managed Long Term Services and Supports populations. The health plan works with members and their families, caregivers, providers, advocates, peer and family organizations and community groups to help them achieve better health outcomes.

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From California to Connecticut, Investing in Health at the Local Level

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In Davidson, North Carolina, chronically ill community members will have increased access to essential services. In West Chester, Pennsylvania, more of the local uninsured population will be able to participate in a non-opioid pain management program.

Those city’s free health clinics, along with nearly 130 others from California to Connecticut, will be better able to meet their community’s health needs thanks to nearly $3 million in grants from CVS Health and its Foundation to the National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics (NAFC) and their members.

The grants furthers Aetna and CVS Health’s commitment to building healthier communities by investing in health at the local level, as these clinics will help better manage chronic disease, provide more wraparound services to address the social determinants of health, support treatment and prevention of substance abuse, including opioids and tobacco, and more.

Ranging from $10,000 – 20,000 each, the grants will be distributed to Free & Charitable Clinics in California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Washington.

“Taking on these root causes of poor health will help us create lasting change towards health equity in America,” – Nicole Lamoureux, President & CEO of the NAFC.

The new funds bring the company and the CVS Health Foundation’s total contribution to NAFC to nearly $8 million since 2015.

Supporting Aetna and CVS Health’s combined goals of improving outcomes and lowering costs, more than 17,000 patients across the country had access to needed health care in 2018 as a result of last year’s NAFC grants funding. Two grantees alone saved their local hospitals $9.7 million by providing primary care to patients who would otherwise rely on the emergency room.

For more information on how the Free and Charitable Clinics will be utilizing their grants to improve community health, visit www.cvshealth.com/NAFC.

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