Two communities find healthy solutions that work

Two communities find healthy solutions that work
Bottom of the article

Welcome to Healthy Communities News — where we highlight communities that are finding innovative solutions to solve local health challenges. Our first episode features communities battling two common and persistent problems: food deserts and heart disease. In Bridgeport, Connecticut, the East End Pop Up Market gives residents easy access to fresh food for the first time in four decades. In Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, church leaders are mixing faith with fitness to stem the tide of heart disease and diabetes in their congregations.


New market gives Bridgeport residents access to fresh food

As the economy struggles and poverty rises in Bridgeport, manufacturing jobs are not the only thing leaving town: Residents have had to go farther and farther to find fresh food. But a group of local businesspeople is looking to reverse that trend. They’re opening the new East End Pop-Up Market, which will offer not only fresh food, but also job training and wellness workshops. It’s a solution that can be a model for food deserts across the country.


Bridgeport market gives entrepreneurs a jump start

Small businesses can revitalize neighborhoods – so the Bridgeport OIC is lending a hand to local entrepreneurs. We talk to Jeff Nelson of Seeding Knowledge, a start-up that plants and maintains gardens and sells produce. He’s expanding his services to the East End Pop-Up Market, where he’ll offer not only fruits and vegetables, but cooking classes and gardening instruction.


Faith begets fitness in Mecklenburg County

Faith leaders, county health officials, the local health system and community groups have proven that it takes a village to address local health issues. The Village HeartBEAT program created a fitness challenge in local congregations. The goal? To help residents battling heart disease and diabetes. The program uses exercise, nutrition and community gardens to help raise the spirits and lower the weight of participants.

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
1
Display Hero
Off
Assets
CSR Pillars
Locations
Audience
Narrative themes

CVS Health delivering on commitment to establish up to 1,000 COVID-19 test sites by end of May

Top of the article

First phase will see drive-thru sites open across five states this week; more than 900 additional sites will open over next two weeks

WOONSOCKET, R.I. — Building on the company’s comprehensive efforts to help slow the spread of the virus, on Friday, May 15 CVS Health (NYSE: CVS) will open more than 50 COVID-19 test sites at select CVS Pharmacy drive-thru locations across Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. The opening of hundreds of additional test sites across the country will be announced over the next two weeks.

The new sites will utilize self-swab tests and mark the next phase of the company’s COVID-19 testing strategy, announced April 27 at the White House. CVS Health expects to have up to 1,000 locations across the country offering this service by the end of May, with the goal of processing up to 1.5 million tests per month subject to availability of supplies and lab capacity. The company currently operates large-scale rapid test sites in coordination with five states, which can process a total of nearly 30,000 tests per week.

"While the large-scale test sites we’ve been operating since early April have proven successful, this new approach allows us to utilize our presence in communities across the country and bring testing closer to home," said Larry J. Merlo, President and CEO, CVS Health. "Our frontline employees will continue to play a critical role in the testing process, with members of their communities directly benefitting from their dedication and selflessness.”

Self-swab tests will be available to individuals meeting Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria, in addition to age guidelines. Patients must register in advance at CVS.com beginning Friday, May 15 to schedule an appointment. Patients will be required to stay in their cars and directed to the pharmacy drive-thru window where they will be provided with a test kit and given instructions, and a CVS Pharmacy team member will observe the self-swab process to ensure it is done properly. Tests will be sent to an independent, third-party lab for processing and the results will be available in approximately three days.

Testing will not take place inside any retail locations, and CVS Pharmacy, HealthHUB and MinuteClinic will continue to serve customers and patients.

More information on steps CVS Health has taken to address the COVID-19 pandemic, including support for health care providers and clinicians facing financial and administrative strain, is available at the company's frequently updated COVID-19 resource center.

About CVS Health

CVS Health employees are united around a common goal of becoming the most consumer-centric health company in the world. We're evolving based on changing consumer needs and meeting people where they are, whether that's in the community at one of our nearly 10,000 local touchpoints, in the home, or in the palm of their hand. Our newest offerings – from HealthHUB® locations that are redefining what a pharmacy can be, to innovative programs that help manage chronic conditions – are designed to create a higher-quality, simpler and more affordable experience. Learn more about how we're transforming health at www.cvshealth.com.

Media contact

T.J. Crawford
212-457-0583
crawfordt2@aetna.com

Cars in queue at a CVS Pharmacy drive-thru location, waiting to take the expanded self-swab COVID-19 test. (Available at certain locations.)
Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Press Release
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
8
Display Hero
On
CSR Pillars
Audience

CVS Health expands rapid COVID-19 drive-through testing sites to Connecticut

Top of the article

CVS Health today announced the launch of a new rapid COVID-19 drive-through testing site in New Haven, Connecticut, in conjunction with federal and state officials. The site will provide state residents with rapid COVID-19 testing and on-the-spot results at no cost, using the new Abbott ID NOW™ COVID-19 test. CVS Health opened similar large-scale rapid testing sites last week in Georgia, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and since March the company has conducted approximately 25,000 COVID-19 tests.

Testing will be overseen by licensed health care providers from MinuteClinic, the retail medical clinic inside CVS Pharmacy locations, with assistance from CVS pharmacists and will take place in a parking lot at the former Gateway Community College campus at Long Wharf, located at 60 Sargent Drive in New Haven. Patients will receive results on-site so they can properly quarantine or seek treatment as appropriate. No COVID-19 testing will take place at CVS Pharmacy or MinuteClinic locations.

“Rapid testing is a crucial step in helping communities manage the spread of the virus, and this is a concrete example of the private and public sectors coming together to bring much needed testing capabilities to some of the hardest hit states like Connecticut,” said Troyen Brennan, MD, MPH, Chief Medical Officer and Executive Vice President, CVS Health. “With four large-scale sites now operating across the country, our dedicated health care professionals are able to process thousands of tests every day.”

“While a vaccine does not yet exist for this virus, one of the ways we can mitigate its impact is through increasing our testing capacity,” said Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont. “Not only will this new testing site significantly increase the number of people being tested, but the speed at which we can get results will aid in our effort to prevent further spread of this disease. Public-private partnerships like this will only strengthen our state in the fight against the coronavirus. We appreciate the community outreach that CVS Health is doing here in Connecticut as their work is quite literally saving lives.”

Rapid COVID-19 testing will be available to eligible individuals who meet criteria established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in addition to state residency and age guidelines. Patients will need to pre-register in advance online at CVS.com in order to schedule a same-day time slot for testing. To help ensure the safety of both patients and health care providers, the testing site cannot accommodate walk-ups and patients are required to remain in their vehicles throughout the entire testing process.

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Press Release
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
5
Display Hero
Off
Topics
Locations
Audience

Drive-thru testing brings relief to thousands

Bottom of the article

CVS Health was the first retail location in the nation to offer drive-thru COVID-19 testing for first responders, law enforcement and health care providers. After the initial pilot in Shrewsbury (now closed), the company has now made free rapid testing available to the public in Georgia, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

“Our MinuteClinic providers join countless other heroic health care professionals across the country and around the world in forming the first line of defense against this devastating virus,” said Troyen Brennan, MD, chief medical officer and executive vice president, CVS Health.

The sites are located in large, easily accessible parking lots at the Georgia Tech campus in Atlanta, Twin River Casino in Lincoln, Rhode Island, and the Showcase Cinemas in Lowell, Massachusetts.

“By working with a wide range of partners, we have dramatically increased Massachusetts’ COVID-19 testing capacity, and we are grateful to CVS for their partnership in launching this new rapid testing site,” said Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker. 

Up to 1,000 tests can be conducted daily at each of the three sites. Additional testing sites may be added in the coming months.  

A medical professional examines a swab taken from a patient at a COVID-19 rapid testing drive-through site.

“This marks a giant leap forward in our efforts to combat the virus,” said Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo, adding that the new CVS-operated site will double her state’s testing capability. 

The new testing sites use a new COVID-19 test from Abbott Laboratories that was authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in March. The test is available to eligible residents in each state who meet criteria set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Patients are required to pre-register online at CVS.com to schedule a same-day time slot. Testing is available seven days a week.

Patients use a self-administered nasal swab to collect a sample while remaining in their cars. Results are delivered on the spot within five minutes to receive a positive test result and approximately 13 minutes for a negative result. 

“Increased access to rapid testing remains one of our top priorities in order to identify more cases, get Georgians the care they need, and prevent further infection in our communities,” says Governor Brian P. Kemp. “This unique, public-private partnership will strengthen our testing capability as we continue to take the fight to COVID-19 in Georgia.”

A line of cars queuing at a CVS Health rapid COVID-19 testing site.
Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
6
Display Hero
On
Topics
Audience

CVS Health and its foundations support community and employee needs amid COVID-19 pandemic

Top of the article

WOONSOCKET, R.I. — CVS Health (NYSE: CVS) today announced the company and its foundations are giving more than $1 million in new investments to address food insecurity and other community needs in response to ongoing challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic. The CVS Health Foundation will also match up to $1 million in employee contributions to the CVS Health Employee Relief Fund, a public charity supporting colleagues during unanticipated and unavoidable financial hardships and emergencies. The fund will make $1,000 grants available to employees to address qualifying emergency needs related to the pandemic. CVS Health is also easing programmatic restrictions on certain grants made by the company and its foundations in 2019 and 2020 to give nonprofit organizations more flexibility to use the donated funds to address the most pressing needs.

“Supporting the communities we serve and building on the steps CVS Health has taken to support its employees aligns with our purpose of helping people on their path to better health,” said Eileen Howard Boone, SVP of Corporate Social Responsibility and Philanthropy for CVS Health, and President of the CVS Health and Aetna Foundations. “We’re also focused on much-needed flexibility for our partners, including loosening existing grant guidelines whenever possible.”

CVS Health and its foundations are addressing community needs with support for United Ways and other community organizations responding to the pandemic. Much of that support is dedicated to Rhode Island, Connecticut and Arizona, where many of the company’s employees are based. The CVS Health Foundation has provided $100,000 to the United Way of Rhode Island to support the Rhode Island COVID-19 Response Fund, and the Aetna Foundation has provided $100,000 to support the Connecticut United Ways’ Neighbors in Need Emergency Response Fund. In addition, the company has provided $50,000 to the Arizona Community Foundation’s COVID-19 Community Response Fund.

CVS Health is also providing $250,000 to support the nation’s largest domestic hunger-relief organization, Feeding America, which is responding to the pandemic by distributing emergency food boxes to its network of 200 food banks across the country to support vulnerable populations. The company is further addressing food insecurity with support for local food banks and nutrition-focused nonprofit organizations in many states, including some of the hardest-hit such as New York, California and Washington.

“There are many people in the communities we serve who lack access to basic needs, including food and personal hygiene products. We’re supporting organizations of all sizes that have the infrastructure in place to provide relief in the safest way possible,” said Boone.

About CVS Health

CVS Health employees are united around a common goal of becoming the most consumer-centric health company in the world. We're evolving based on changing consumer needs and meeting people where they are, whether that's in the community at one of our nearly 10,000 local touchpoints, in the home, or in the palm of their hand. Our newest offerings – from HealthHUB® locations that are redefining what a pharmacy can be, to innovative programs that help manage chronic conditions – are designed to create a higher-quality, simpler and more affordable experience. Learn more about how we're transforming health at http://www.cvshealth.com.

About the CVS Health Foundation

The CVS Health Foundation is a private charitable organization created by CVS Health that works to build healthier communities, enabling people of all ages to lead healthy, productive lives. The Foundation provides strategic investments to nonprofit partners throughout the U.S. who help increase community-based access to health care for underserved populations, create innovative approaches to chronic disease management and provide tobacco cessation and youth prevention programming. We also invest in scholarship programs that open the pathways to careers in pharmacy to support the academic aspirations of the best and brightest talent in the industry. Our philanthropy also extends to supporting our colleagues' spirit of volunteerism through Volunteer Challenge Grants to nonprofits where they donate their time and fundraising efforts. To learn more about the CVS Health Foundation and its giving, visit www.cvshealth.com/social-responsibility.

About the Aetna Foundation

The Aetna Foundation is a charitable and philanthropic affiliate of CVS Health. As a national health foundation, the Aetna Foundation promotes wellness, health and access to high-quality health care for everyone.

Media contact

Erin Shields Britt
Corporate Communications
Erin.Britt@CVSHealth.com

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Press Release
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
7
Display Hero
Off
CSR Pillars
Audience

Making communities stronger by volunteering time, talent and resources

Bottom of the article
Just one example of how we’re making communities stronger by encouraging employees to volunteer their time, talent and resources to local organizations.
Tweet this

Working part-time, Maria Martinez does her best to support her two kids, but sometimes it’s not enough to make ends meet. After falling behind on her gas bill, she needed help.

That’s when she attended a “Keep the Power On” utility clinic and connected with a group of CVS Health lawyers working pro bono to help Hartford residents struggling to pay their utility bills — just one example of how we’re making communities stronger by encouraging employees to volunteer their time, talent and resources to local organizations.

“Being a lawyer, you are an advocate, so instead of advocating for the company, I'm now advocating for an individual,” says Jen Corvo, CVS Health counsel. “Pro bono programs like this are great because we are meeting people at something that really does affect their daily life.”

Watch the video to see how we’re reaching out and helping community members like Maria.

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
3
Display Hero
Off
CSR Pillars
Locations
Audience

Aetna Foundation Announces $1 Million in Grants to Boys & Girls Clubs in Providence and Hartford

Top of the article

New funding across five years will support programs designed to promote healthier lifestyles for youth under the age of 18

WOONSOCKET, R.I. As part of its commitment to building healthier communities, the Aetna Foundation today announced it will be donating a total of $1 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Providence and Hartford. Both locations will receive $500,000 over the next five years.

The new funding from the Aetna Foundation, a private foundation affiliated with CVS Health, will help the Boys & Girls Clubs to reach hundreds of additional young people through innovative and effective programming. The grants will support programs that are focused on preventing underage substance misuse, including tobacco and vaping products, while also providing guidance on how to improve the overall health of youth in these communities.

"We know how important it is to teach healthy behaviors from a young age in order to ensure that young people have the tools and refusal skills they need to stay away from harmful habits like smoking," said Dr. Garth Graham, Vice President, Community Health & Impact, CVS Health and President, Aetna Foundation. "We believe the Boys & Girls Clubs of Providence and Hartford are uniquely equipped to help us evaluate the best approaches to educate young people about the dangers of substance misuse and teach healthy lifestyle choices. From there, we'll aim to replicate the successful approaches across other relationships and geographies."

The majority of the funding will help deliver "Positive Action" - a nationally acclaimed prevention program originally developed through partnerships between prevention specialists and Boys & Girls Clubs around the country to more young people in these communities. Participants in the "Positive Action" program are exposed to a variety of activities designed to hone their decision-making and critical thinking skills and help them learn how to avoid and resist alcohol, tobacco, other drugs, and premature sexual activity.

"Positive Action is a comprehensive strategy that helps young people better navigate the challenging path from childhood to adulthood," said Nicole Dufresne, CEO, Boys & Girls Clubs of Providence. "We are confident that the youth and teens who participate in this program will be armed with the crucial knowledge needed to lead a healthy lifestyle and have a great future. And we truly appreciate the support from both the CVS Health Foundation and Aetna Foundation, who have consistently been great community partners to us over the years."

These grants are part of CVS Health's commitment to help deliver the first tobacco-free generation. Through Be The First, the company and its foundations have committed to invest $50 million over five years to help deliver the first tobacco-free generation. These grants support efforts around healthy behavior programming for young people to ensure they have the tools and refusal skills they need to lead the healthiest lifestyle.

These grants also celebrate the long-standing commitment Boys & Girls Clubs have on helping our youth to be the best that they can be. The Boys & Girls Clubs of Providence is the longest continuously operating Boys & Girls Club in the country and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Hartford were the first ever Clubs to be formed. In addition to previous grants to the Boys & Girls Clubs in Hartford and Providence, CVS Health and Aetna colleagues regularly volunteer at locations throughout the home states of Rhode Island and Connecticut. The hundreds of colleague volunteer hours support large-scale annual events for the Boys & Girls Clubs in Hartford and Providence, as well as day-to-day interaction with young people participating in programs at these locations.

About the Aetna Foundation

The Aetna Foundation is an independent charitable and philanthropic affiliate of CVS Health (NYSE: CVS). As a national health foundation, the Aetna Foundation promotes wellness, health and access to high-quality health care for everyone. This work is enhanced by the time and commitment of Aetna employees, who volunteered 670,000 hours in 2018 alone. For more information, visit www.aetnafoundation.org.

Media Contacts

Erin Britt
401-770-9237
erin.britt@cvshealth.com

Ethan Slavin
860-273-6095
slavine@aetna.com

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Press Release
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
1
Display Hero
Off
Campaign
CSR Pillars
Audience

Aetna Foundation’s New Awards Shine the “Spotlight” on Programs That Are Improving Community Health

Top of the article

From Complete Streets to Community Gardens: 10 Cities and Counties Recognized for Programs Making Progress in Addressing Social Determinants of Health

HARTFORD, Conn. — The Aetna Foundation today announced 10 community health programs nationwide that are receiving their newly-launched "Spotlight Award." The award is part of the Healthiest Cities & Counties Challenge (the Challenge), an initiative launched in 2016 that supports 50 small-to-midsize cities and counties that are implementing innovative solutions to pressing public health issues in their communities. Along with the American Public Health Association (APHA) and the National Association of Counties (NACo), the Aetna Foundation selected these 50 programs because of their ability to tackle social determinants of health (SDoH) that frequently lead to chronic health issues.

The 10 Spotlight awardees will receive a $25,000 prize to further support their Challenge programs, which will help build sustainable models that can be used in other communities. In addition, five more organizations will receive a $10,000 prize as Honorable Mention awardees to help accelerate and advance their work. Some of the notable achievements from awardees include:

  • The iGrow Food Network distributed more than 100 pounds of produce grown in local community gardens during the summer of 2017, reaching more than one-third of the target population in food deserts in Tallahassee, Florida.
     
  • Walk Works ChesCo! created new walking routes in Chester County, Pennsylvania to encourage residents to walk more and adopt a healthier lifestyle. The community successfully reached their goal of walking one billion steps in 2017 in just six months.

"Where a person lives has a profound impact on how they live – particularly when it comes to their health," said Mark T. Bertolini, the chairman of the Aetna Foundation and chairman and CEO of Aetna. "The Spotlight Award recipients are outstanding examples of how important progress can be made when communities work together to look at the biggest issues facing their neighborhoods and develop healthy, home-grown solutions."

Through the Challenge, $1.5 million in prizes will be awarded to cities and counties that are able to show measurable improvements in health outcomes over the course of several years through cross-sector partnerships. The Challenge is designed to enable participants to share successful health improvement strategies with other communities.

"Since the Challenge launched, we have seen numerous improvements and advancements in the health of the 50 participating communities," said APHA executive director Georges C. Benjamin, MD. "The Spotlight Awards are a moment to showcase the innovative work being done in cities and counties to address social determinants of health."

The goal of the Spotlight Award is to highlight early success stories from participants that have demonstrated significant progress since the launch of the Challenge. The selected programs have identified creative partnerships and enacted programs that address the unique health issues facing their communities in meaningful ways.

"Communities invest heavily in local residents' health and well-being, often serving as a safety net for low-income and vulnerable residents," said NACo president Roy Charles Brooks. "We know just as each community is unique, so too are the health challenges they face. These award winners are examples of what can be achieved when counties work with community partners to solve serious, complex public health issues."

In 2016, the Challenge chose 50 cities and counties as HealthyCommunity50 members based on their plans to improve local health outcomes. The HealthyCommunity50 continue to compete for overall Challenge prize awards ranging from $25,000 – $500,000. Participants will be judged on their own progress and will not be competing against each other.

Spotlight Award Winners

Bridgeport Coalition United to Reach Equity
Greater Bridgeport Opportunities Industrialization Center Inc., Connecticut
Program Goal: Increase health equity

iGrow Food Network
Florida Department of Health
Program Goal: Decrease food inequality

Live Healthy Little Havana
City of Miami, Florida
Program Goal: Increase health care access

Louisville/Jefferson County Metro Government
West Louisville Outdoor Recreation Initiative, Kentucky
Program Goal: Increase mental wellness and healthy behaviors

The SMART Initiative
Coopers Ferry Partnership, New Jersey
Program Goal: Increase water quality

Chatham Health Alliance
Chatham County Public Health Department, North Carolina
Program Goal: Decrease obesity

Village HeartBEAT
Mecklenburg County Health Department, North Carolina
Program Goal: Decrease heart disease

The Heart of Texas Urban Gardening Coalition
Waco-McLennan County Public Health District, Texas
Program Goal: Increase access to, and consumption of, fresh foods

Health Collaborative
Danville Pittsylvania County United Fund, Virginia
Program Goal: Increase healthy living

Active Design for a Healthier Thurston County
Thurston County Public Health & Social Services, Washington
Program Goal: Increase walkability

Honorable Mention

Food is Medicine
City of St. Petersburg, Florida
Program Goal: Increase access, availability and procurement of healthy foods

Be Well, B'More
Baltimore City Health Department, Maryland
Program Goal: Increase physical activity

Blue Print for Violence Reduction
City of Jersey City, New Jersey
Program Goal: Increase healthy behaviors to decrease violence

The North Carolina Healthiest Counties Cross-Sector Team
Duke University: Durham and Cabarrus Counties, North Carolina
Program Goal: Increase health equity

Walk Works ChesCo!
Chester County, Pennsylvania
Program Goal: Increase walking

For more information on the winners, visit www.healthiestcities.org and join the conversation at #HealthiestCitiesChallenge.

The Aetna Foundation is the independent charitable and philanthropic arm of Aetna (NYSE: AET). Since 1980, Aetna and the Aetna Foundation have contributed more than $465 million in grants and sponsorships. As a national health foundation, we promote wellness, health, and access to high-quality health care for everyone. This work is enhanced by the time and commitment of Aetna employees, who have volunteered 3.8 million hours since 2003. For more information, visit www.aetnafoundation.org.

The American Public Health Association champions the health of all people and all communities. We strengthen the profession of public health, share the latest research and information, promote best practices and advocate for public health issues and policies grounded in research. We are the only organization that combines a 140-plus year perspective, a broad-based member community and the ability to influence federal policy to improve the public's health. Visit us at www.apha.org.

The National Association of Counties (NACo) unites America's 3,069 county governments. Founded in 1935, NACo brings county officials together to advocate with a collective voice on national policy, exchange ideas and build new leadership skills, pursue transformational county solutions, enrich the public's understanding of county government and exercise exemplary leadership in public service. For more information, visit www.naco.org.

Media Contacts:

Aetna
Ethan Slavin
860-273-6095
slavine@aetna.com

BRG Communications
Katy Frame
703-739-8358
kframe@brgcommunications.com

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Press Release
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
0
Display Hero
Off
CSR Pillars
Audience

From California to Connecticut, Investing in Health at the Local Level

Bottom of the article

In Davidson, North Carolina, chronically ill community members will have increased access to essential services. In West Chester, Pennsylvania, more of the local uninsured population will be able to participate in a non-opioid pain management program.

Those city’s free health clinics, along with nearly 130 others from California to Connecticut, will be better able to meet their community’s health needs thanks to nearly $3 million in grants from CVS Health and its Foundation to the National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics (NAFC) and their members.

The grants furthers Aetna and CVS Health’s commitment to building healthier communities by investing in health at the local level, as these clinics will help better manage chronic disease, provide more wraparound services to address the social determinants of health, support treatment and prevention of substance abuse, including opioids and tobacco, and more.

Ranging from $10,000 – 20,000 each, the grants will be distributed to Free & Charitable Clinics in California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Washington.

“Taking on these root causes of poor health will help us create lasting change towards health equity in America,” – Nicole Lamoureux, President & CEO of the NAFC.

The new funds bring the company and the CVS Health Foundation’s total contribution to NAFC to nearly $8 million since 2015.

Supporting Aetna and CVS Health’s combined goals of improving outcomes and lowering costs, more than 17,000 patients across the country had access to needed health care in 2018 as a result of last year’s NAFC grants funding. Two grantees alone saved their local hospitals $9.7 million by providing primary care to patients who would otherwise rely on the emergency room.

For more information on how the Free and Charitable Clinics will be utilizing their grants to improve community health, visit www.cvshealth.com/NAFC.

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Press Release
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
0
Display Hero
Off
CSR Pillars
Audience

Aetna Foundation’s ‘Spotlight Award’: 10 programs improving community health

Bottom of the article

Ten U.S. community health programs participating in the Healthiest Cities & Counties Challenge received the Aetna Foundation’s “Spotlight Award.” The awardees will receive a $25,000 prize to further support their programs, which will help build sustainable models that can be used in other communities.

“Where a person lives has a profound impact on how they live – particularly when it comes to their health,” said Mark T. Bertolini, the chairman of the Aetna Foundation and chairman and CEO of Aetna. “The Spotlight Award recipients are outstanding examples of how important progress can be made when communities work together to look at the biggest issues facing their neighborhoods and develop healthy, home-grown solutions.”

The Spotlight Awards highlight the early success stories from participants that have demonstrated significant progress since the launch of the Healthiest Cities & Counties Challenge.

“Communities invest heavily in local residents’ health and well-being, often serving as a safety net for low-income and vulnerable residents,” said Roy Charles Brooks, president of the National Association of Counties. “We know just as each community is unique, so too are the health challenges they face. These award winners are examples of what can be achieved when counties work with community partners to solve serious, complex public health issues.”

In addition, five community health programs were recognized as Honorable Mention awardees and will receive a $10,000 prize to advance their work. The programs are a part of the Healthy50 — the 50 finalists in the Healthiest Cities & Counties Challenge, which will award $1.5 million in prizes to cities and counties that show measurable improvements in health outcomes over the course of several years through cross-sector partnerships.

“Since the Challenge launched, we have seen numerous improvements and advancements in the health of the 50 participating communities,” said Georges C. Benjamin, M.D., executive director of the American Public Health Association. “The Spotlight Awards are a moment to showcase the innovative work being done in cities and counties to address social determinants of health.”

Spotlight Award winners

Bridgeport Coalition United to Reach Equity — Connecticut

Bridgeport Coalition United to Reach Equity, a project designed to help residents of Bridgeport address the lack of fresh fruits and vegetables in their community.

The East End Neighborhood Revitalization Zone’s Pop-up Market leveraged its strategic community partnerships and made a concerted effort to include residents in the entire community engagement process. The process included job creation, types of job training programs and identifying small businesses for development training to improve access to healthy, affordable food in the East End community.

iGrow Food Network — Florida

Tallahassee Leon County is working to address pockets of food source inequality in Tallahassee and Leon County.

The iGrow Food Network is a culturally-competent youth empowerment and urban agriculture entrepreneurship program of the Tallahassee Food Network that leverages community partnerships to focus on education, outreach and community engagement to achieve food security in USDA-designated food deserts by increasing healthy food access.

Live Healthy Little Havana — Florida

Live Healthy Little Havana’s goal is to strengthen community capacity to collaboratively plan and collectively carryout strategies to improve health. Residents are addressing physical activity, primary care and improving the community’s walk score.

West Louisville Outdoor Recreation Initiative — Kentucky

West Louisville Outdoor Recreation Initiative Louisville Metro Government intends to build culture residents connect to nature to improve physical and mental health by increasing physical activity and reducing toxic stress, as well as increasing social cohesion to deter crime.

The West Louisville Outdoor Recreation Initiative created multiple annual paths through its parks department and community partners. The paths allow youth ages 3 to 19 to engage with nature.

The SMART Initiative — New Jersey

The SMART Initiative will reduce the number of sewer overflows to improve water quality in waterways and green infrastructure with a robust focus on community input and guidance.

The Initiative reengages diverse residents through innovative community meetings, forums, large scale events and mobile applications to educate residents on the impact of combined sewer systems and green infrastructure.

Chatham Health Alliance — North Carolina

Chatham Health Alliance is implementing a multilevel initiative targeting obesity, the leading health issue identified in a 2014 Community Health Assessment.

The project leverages partnerships built between the Health Department, the Alliance and numerous stakeholders by embedding a Health in All Policies approach in the Chatham Country Comprehensive Plan, which sets the vision for the county over the next 25 years.

Village HeartBEAT — North Carolina

The Village HeartBEAT program is working to reduce the incidence of heart disease in the Public Health Priority Areas zip codes.

The program works in collaboration with all members of faith-based organizations and leaders to engage and ensure that everyone in Mecklenburg County enjoy good health, regardless of their race, ethnicity, gender, disability, age or socioeconomic status.

The Heart of Texas Urban Gardening Coalition — Texas

The Heart of Texas Urban Gardening Coalition is helping residents in three zip codes to more easily access and eat healthy foods by promoting current resources of fresh and locally grown food, hosting nutrition education sessions, and utilizing community health workers to connect residents to resources, as well as providing fresh produce delivery.

The Coalition partners with Waco area organizations to create awareness and access to the available fresh local produce by utilizing local vendors and resources, such as the Mobile Farmer’s Market.

Health Collaborative — Virginia

The Health Collaborative has created action teams in four areas: healthy eating, active living, access to health care and cross-cutting approaches.

The Health collaborative focuses on policies, systems and environmental change to support the creation of effective and inclusive policies. The Collaborative is providing access to food and opportunities for physical activity.

Active Design for a Healthier Thurston County — Washington

Thurston County addresses the need for better conditions to support physical activity in key county areas to increase access to and promotion of the trail system.

The project developed and applied web-based tools for data collection and display of information as part of the “walkshed” analysis, which measured the walkability around various locations. The analysis was aimed at boosting physical activity levels.

Honorable mentions

Food is Medicine — Florida

The Food is Medicine program aims to improve the health of people living in food deserts or low-income/low food access areas of St. Petersburg, Florida. The program offers residents access to low cost produce, increases educational opportunities and works to eliminate barriers to health.

The program uses a multifaceted approach to improve health behaviors and influence change. It uses education, community collaboration, biometric screenings and participant incentives. The program also offers evidence-based curriculum in areas such as wellness, nutrition, healthy cooking, budgeting for healthy eating, fitness, childhood obesity prevention, diabetes and other chronic diseases.

Be Well, B’More — Maryland

The goal of Be Well, B’More is to increase physical activity and promote activities unifying Baltimore residents in the city’s outdoor space across neighborhoods.

The program uses trusted local partners within the neighborhoods through new cross-sector collaborations. Community organizations, such as Girl Trek and health Freedom Inc., as well as media partners, such as WBAL and the Baltimore Sun, allowed the program’s reach to expand.

Blue Print for Violence Reduction — New Jersey

Jersey City, New Jersey, reclassified community violence as a health issue. The project aims to promote healthier behaviors as a strategy for reducing violence.

Organizations worked together to focus on improving youth health in new and engaging ways that include non-traditional activities, such as chess and yoga, and violence interruptions, including “Occupy the Block” events.

The North Carolina Healthiest Counties Cross-Sector Team — North Carolina

The North Carolina Healthiest Counties Cross-Sector Team seeks to improve population health, payment reform and health equity in both Cabarrus and Durham Counties by addressing nutrition/food insecurity, physical activity, tobacco use, integrating physical activity “prescriptions” into clinical care and piloting health care delivery and payment reform through community health workers.

The Durham County Health Department and its partners launched public policy changes to encourage greater utilization of Community Health Workers to improve the physical and financial health of the county to improve the physical and financial health of the county.

Walk Works ChesCo! — Pennsylvania

The program’s goal is to promote, educate and empower people to adopt a healthier lifestyle by encouraging residents to walk through the Walk Works ChesCo! Program.

The program reached out to a diverse group of partner organizations to promote the challenge to get community members engaged. The group was actively engaged in planning, implementing and participating in the Challenge. Walk Works routes were announced in Coatesville and Phoenixville.

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Press Release
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
0
Display Hero
Off
Assets
CSR Pillars
Audience