Celebrating our 10-year partnership with diverse supplier WEI

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Our partnerships with small and diverse businesses are mutually beneficial: They help us ensure that our products and services evolve to meet the needs of our customers, while also providing economic opportunity to our suppliers.

In fact, in 2018, our Supplier Diversity Program contributed $5.5 billion to the U.S. economy and sustained 31,000 jobs. This success would not be possible without the partnerships we have with our suppliers like New Hampshire-based WEI.

Since partnering with CVS Health 10 years ago to provide IT consulting services and solutions, WEI has been able to increase its workforce by 80 percent, growth that Co-Founder and Vice President Leslie Rosas says has a “trickle-down effect” in allowing WEI to use more diverse suppliers in their own supply chain and to develop a more diverse workforce of their own.

On the CVS Health side, WEI has become an expansion of the IT team, filling a critical company need and ready to help whenever we need them.

Watch the video to learn more about how our two companies have worked together and contributed to each other’s growth over the past 10 years.

Visit our Supplier Diversity page to learn more about our program.

To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

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Abilities in Abundance: Our continued commitment to inclusive employment

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With recent national unemployment rates for individuals with disabilities more than double that of people without disabilities, it’s evident that the disability community continues to face significant barriers to gaining and maintaining employment. At CVS Health, we’re addressing the national disability employment gap and helping break down the barriers faced by far too many with differing abilities. Our company’s ongoing commitment to diversity and inclusion means that we believe in connecting individuals with disabilities with rewarding work experiences at CVS Health, which we do through our nationally recognized Abilities in Abundance program.

Led by CVS Health’s Workforce Initiatives team, Abilities in Abundance provides the tools, training, and support individuals need to build a path to better health, discover new career prospects and create a more promising future for themselves. Abilities in Abundance offers highly successful skills development programs, job training, and placement opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, as well as those with visual impairments.

Through CVS Health’s ongoing work with partners from government organizations, community associations, and educational institutions, we’re able to find strong candidates who are often untapped sources of talent and are committed to learning the skills necessary to grow their careers. In collaboration with workforce partners and third-party organizations, we’ve been able to create effective workforce development programs aimed primarily towards job seekers from populations typically underrepresented in workplaces.

Training our Abilities in Abundance program participants

CVS Health’s invaluable relationships with state and local agencies, including the National Consortium of State-Operated Comprehensive Rehabilitation Centers (NCSOCRC) and Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), have enabled us to help many individuals with disabilities gain meaningful employment.

For example, in collaboration with NCSOCR, we currently operate eight mock CVS Pharmacy locations, where people with disabilities receive classroom and hands-on training in life and job skills such as providing customer service, stocking shelves and working at the cash register. Each center is installed with mock equipment and participants work closely with trained staff to learn about the roles and responsibilities of front store and pharmacy technician positions.

CVS Health currently operates eight mock CVS Pharmacy locations, where people with disabilities receive classroom and hands-on training in life and job skills such as providing customer service, stocking shelves and working at the cash register.
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Our Workforce Innovation & Talent Centers (WITC), which are a part of CVS Health’s Workforce Initiatives program, also play a key role in the ongoing success of the Abilities in Abundance program, incorporating education on job skills and providing exposure to work in a retail environment. Each WITC houses a classroom, office space, a full mock pharmacy that closely resembles an active CVS Pharmacy location and is staffed by a full-time manager who facilitates relationships with internal and external partners. Many of the individuals who participate at our WITC later transition to positions within CVS Health or leverage their experience to obtain work elsewhere. Additionally, retention rates among CVS Health colleagues who participate in a WITC program are higher than for other colleagues.

Creating opportunities for individuals of all abilities

Kevin Kan, one of the many Abilities in Abundance success stories featured in the video, began his employment at CVS Pharmacy after completing the first ever mock store training program held in the New York City WITC with community partner FEGS, a nonprofit health and human services organization.

Kevin stood out among the crowd right from the beginning, as he was eager to learn all the retail store associate tasks and really strived to put his best foot forward throughout the customized employment program. Following the mock store training program, Kevin applied and interviewed for the retail store associate role, prior to even completing an in-store work experience program.

Kevin’s incredible work ethic and willingness to assist customers and his other colleagues has made him an exemplary retail employee. He has also volunteered to be a guest speaker for our mock store training program associates and has been asked on multiple occasions to join partnership meetings to share his experience with Abilities in Abundance.

To learn more about CVS Health’s employment and training programs, including Abilities in Abundance, visit the Workforce Initiatives page.

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Diverse Supplier Spotlight: Planned Packaging of Illinois

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A photo of PPOIC President and CEO Jason Robertson with members of the CVS Health team.
PPOIC President and CEO Jason Robertson (center) with members of the CVS Health team.

Our Supplier Diversity program works to integrate products and services from small and diverse businesses into our procurement processes.

These partnerships help us ensure that our products and services evolve to meet the needs of our customers, while also contributing to the economic growth of communities across the country.

In 2018, our spending with small and diverse businesses — including 398 owned by women and 373 owned by minorities — totaled $2.2 billion.

One of those businesses is Planned Packaging of Illinois (PPOIC), a worldwide distributor of shipping and packing materials that has been working with CVS Caremark, our pharmacy benefit manager, since 2007 and has since gone on to expand its support to other parts of CVS Health. Here, President and CEO Jason Robertson shares what it’s been like to be part of our Supplier Diversity program.

What services and/or products do you provide to CVS Health?
PPOIC is a just-in-time supplier of various packaging and shipping supplies, including gel packs, zip lock bags, stretch film, tape and corrugated boxes. PPOIC manages the daily inventory of these items and ships to CVS locations on an as-need basis. We store the product close to the various CVS locations to assure prompt delivery.

How has the partnership with CVS Health been beneficial to your business and the communities you serve?
The partnership has been beneficial on multiple levels, primarily that working with a Fortune 10 company lets everyone know we’re a capable supplier.

In addition, our growth with CVS Health has allowed PPOIC to expand and open two additional locations in North Carolina and Tennessee. These locations have provided jobs to primarily lower income individuals and two-strike felons who otherwise wouldn’t have been able to find employment.

PPOIC is proud to say that our North Carolina and Tennessee locations have an awesome employee retention rate, and we have seen tremendous positive impact on those employees’ lives.

Has working with CVS Health changed the way you do business?
PPOIC has had to change our internal business operations to support CVS. In doing so, we’ve become more efficient at customer care, customer response, and overall customer service. As we continue to grow together, we look forward to becoming a better, stronger, more efficient company.

Any business highlights that you attribute to working with CVS Health?
Working with the CVS Health Supplier Diversity team, PPOIC has had the pleasure of accompanying CVS Health to the White House to meet President Barack Obama in 2014, receiving a Ruby Award in 2015, and, most recently, I served as a panelist at the 2019 Rainbow Push Wall Street Project Economic Summit to talk about my company’s work with CVS Health.

CVS Health has provided visibility, credibility and a platform to promote our business unlike any other. In short, CVS Health has truly been a partner in mentoring, supporting and promoting PPOIC.

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Developing Bilingual Pharmacists to Break Down Barriers

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A Hispanic pharmacist fills a prescription.

Ashley Mendez’s family fled Cuba in the wake of Fidel Castro’s rise to power and settled in Miami, rebuilding their life from scratch — with little money, few possessions and no ability to speak English.

Watching her family, Ashley understood from a young age how difficult even the simplest tasks could be when you didn’t speak the same language as everyone else. That was particularly true for health care: Ashley and her family believe her grandmother’s death may have been caused in part by miscommunication over the painkiller she was taking for a pinched nerve.

So when it came time to choose a career, Ashley knew exactly what she wanted to do — and where she wanted to do it. She wanted to be a pharmacist and she wanted to work somewhere she could help people who didn’t speak English.

It was the way she could honor her grandmother.

“She was one of the most influential people in my life,” says Ashley. “If we had known more about what was going on, we could have helped her.”

There are many different barriers that prevent people from getting the health care they need: They may live in an area without the right providers, they may lack the transportation to travel to the right facility, they may not have enough money to afford the right treatment.

But one critical barrier that frequently gets overlooked is the language barrier.

According to the U.S. Census Department, the number of residents who speak Spanish at home has skyrocketed 130 percent since 1990, up to about 40 million. That increase has created an overwhelming demand for bilingual pharmacists — but the supply has not kept pace. While Hispanics comprise 18 percent of the nation’s population, they account for less than 5 percent of the pharmacist workforce.

Ashley, 27, is part of CVS Health’s effort to close the gap. She spent the summer of 2017 in an immersive internship program that seeks to help develop bilingual pharmacists. Interns spend 10 weeks shadowing pharmacists who are fluent in Spanish and participating in the care of Spanish-speaking patients. They learn medical terminology, study diseases prevalent in the Hispanic community, and become familiar with the over-the-counter products most popular among Hispanic customers.

The program is an illustration of the company’s belief that you can’t build healthy communities unless you have a workforce that reflects those communities.

“People are looking for a pharmacist they feel comfortable talking to,” says Alex Acuna, 26, another intern in the program, who attended the University of Texas at Austin.

Alex grew up in an El Paso neighborhood that was 80 percent Latino, and in a household where his mother regularly spoke Spanish. But although he could speak a fair amount of Spanish himself, communicating technical details to his Spanish-speaking customers was difficult. Nuances were being lost in translation. In normal conversation, those nuances could be insignificant. When talking about treatments and medication, they could be critical.

Alex knew he had to learn “pharmacy Spanish,” as he described it.

“When was first starting, my Spanish was a little broken,” he says.  “Saying something a certain way could mean something different to a patient.”

The internship program is one of several efforts from CVS Health to address the language gap. Last year, CVS Health gave the Roseman University College of Pharmacy $25,000 to fund Hispanic recruitment and outreach initiatives and establish a pipeline of Spanish-speaking students.

Alex, who earned his license in May, is working now back in his hometown of El Paso. He says he’s grateful to be able to give back to the community that raised him.

Ashley, who attended Florida State University as an undergraduate and studied pharmacy at Mercer University in Atlanta, says she’d love to go back to Miami, where she grew up and where she served her internship.

But she also knows that in Florida, she’ll be one among many Spanish speakers — and that she might do more for the Latino community by staying where she is now.

“There’s a need for Spanish speakers in Atlanta,” she says. “You can tell that the language barrier is a big issue.”

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

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Free Screenings, Helpful Advice and a Visit from Pro Athletes at Project Health

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A customer receives a free health screening.
This Project Health event in Atlanta was one of nearly 600 targeting underserved communities.
A customer receiving a free health screening.
More than 87 percent of patients who attend Project Health events report following-up with their primary care physician.
A CVS Pharmacy store with Project Health sign.
Nearly 600 Project Health free health screenings were held in CVS store locations across the country.

Jean Peterson dropped by the City Line Avenue CVS Pharmacy in West Philadelphia to pick up pictures she’d dropped off at the photo department. Moments later, she also came away with a better picture of her own health — and the chance to snap a selfie with two local heroes: former Villanova basketball star Donte DiVincenzo and state Rep. Morgan Cephas.

Peterson had happened upon one of the many free screenings that CVS Health is offering across the country. During the next four months, nearly 600 Project Health events will take place in multicultural communities with a large number of uninsured or underinsured Americans. At each event, participants receive on-the-spot assessments of weight, blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol levels – tests that can help detect risk for chronic conditions such diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease.

Since its founding in 2006, Project Health’s free health and wellness screenings have delivered more than $127 million in free health care services to nearly 1.7 million Americans.

One of those Americans was Peterson. The 70-year-old retired nurse learned that her blood sugar was a bit high, most likely due to medications she was given after a recent back surgery. “I always take advantage of things like this,” she said. “It doesn’t hurt and it keeps me in touch with what I need to take care of.”

Know Your Numbers

Sometimes, the people who think they need the testing the least are the ones who benefit the most.

Brenda, a screener technician at the Project Health event in the Kendall neighborhood of Miami, said a lot of very fit people come in to be screened, usually because they want to know their BMI. But other tests are just as important. One of her patients was diagnosed with high blood pressure.

“The guy said, ‘I’m very fit, I go to the gym and stuff like that, I train people, too,’” said Brenda, who is applying to medical school. But they tested him three more times – once manually – and the results were the same. “And the doctor was like, ‘Hey, you need to go to your doctor and follow up. Please.’ We were very shocked. He looked extremely healthy, very muscular.”

Speaking Their Language

Many of our Miami stores sit in Hispanic neighborhoods, emphasizing the importance of having bilingual screeners, says Elena Ferrales, a health screening manager for Project Health.

Cristina, a young mother, wheeled her seven-month-old into the Miami store and signed up to have a screening while her baby slept in the stroller. She had diabetes while she was pregnant, and though her levels have gone down, she tries to check them regularly. After her screening, she sat with the doctor and, conversing in both English and Spanish, they discussed her results and he gave her food recommendations.

Later, a similar conversation with an older man was conducted entirely in Spanish.

A Slam Dunk for Health

As much as anyone, professional athletes understand the importance of good health. They also understand that it’s not always easy for people to access the care they need to achieve it.

“If I wake up feeling something is wrong, I know there’s a handful of people ready to check me out,” says Donte DiVincenzo, a two-time NCAA basketball champ with the Villanova Wildcats, now a point guard with the Milwaukee Bucks. “But I shouldn’t get special treatment just because I’m a pro athlete. Everyone should have these resources.”

A handful of athletes were featured speakers at Project Health events. In addition to DiVincenzo, who appeared in Philadelphia, Los Angeles Clippers forward Mfiondu Kabengele spoke in Anaheim and Heat player Bam Adebayo attended the Miami event.

Kabengele says he learned during his first year with the NBA the importance of undergoing regular checkups. Small everyday steps, he says, can add up.

“When you have poor health, everything dumbs down,” he says. “When you're healthy, your motor is good. Preventive care is a reality check to make improvements.”

Being good sports, the athletes joined the customers to be screened. Adebayo – a player for the Heat – noted how easy it was to get screened inside the store.

“You don’t have the anxiety, you don’t have to have an appointment, you don’t need to be there at 8, the anxiety of waiting around, what if something is wrong with me?” he said. “You just walk in, get it, see how it goes.”

Access for All

Morgan Cephas, a track and field star at Central High School in Philadelphia and now a Pennsylvania state representative, knows the importance of health care from the perspective of both an athlete and a policymaker. As vice chair of the House Democrats’ Women’s Health Caucus, she noted that 10 percent of those in her district are uninsured or underinsured.

“Not everyone is the daughter or cousin or friend of a state representative,” she said. “They shouldn’t have to choose between managing their health and keeping a roof over their heads.”

An Immediate Impact

What happens after the screenings is up to the individual. But for one participant, the consultation had an immediate impact.

Zita James, 68, had been on her way to the nearby coffee shop when she noticed signs outside for the free screenings at the Philadelphia location. After her detour to CVS, she chose to make a positive change to her health.

“It stopped me going next door and getting two jelly doughnuts!” she laughed.

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

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CVS Health Named Corporation of the Year by GNEMSDC

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In recognition of our continued work to support diverse suppliers through increased economic opportunities, CVS Health was recently named 2019 National Corporation of the Year by the Greater New England Minority Supplier Development Council (GNEMSDC).

The award was presented at GNEMSDC’s Business Opportunity Conference & Expo and Awards Luncheon, held in September in Springfield, Massachusetts.

During the luncheon, David Casey, chief diversity officer for CVS Health, sat down with GNEMSDC President and CEO Peter Hurst for a fireside chat on the future of healthcare, and how technology will impact the delivery of healthcare.

This is the second consecutive year that CVS Health has received the National Corporation of the Year award.

The mission of GNEMSDC is to advance business opportunities for certified Asian, Black, Hispanic and Native American business enterprises and to connect them to corporate members. One of the region’s leading corporate membership organizations, GNEMSDC was incorporated in 1975 to provide increased procurement and business opportunities for minority businesses of all sizes.

The mission of GNEMSDC aligns with the mission of our Supplier Diversity program, through which we identify and partner with a wide range of diverse suppliers, including minority-owned, women-owned, and veteran-owned businesses, as well as small businesses.

Throughout 2018, we worked with thousands of small and diverse businesses across the country, including 398 owned by women, 373 owned by minorities, 124 owned by veterans and 1,667 small businesses.

CVS Health believes that a diverse supplier base is key to our ability to deliver innovative, high-quality products and services to customers and the communities we serve across the country.

For more on CVS Health’s commitment to supplier diversity and an overview of our program and upcoming events, please visit our Supplier Diversity page.

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Providing Discounted Care to Special Olympics Athletes at MinuteClinic

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Athletes, perhaps more than anyone else, understand the importance of being on top of their physical health.

To make it easier for some of our country’s most impressive athletes to access lower cost, high-quality care, MinuteClinic is working with Special Olympics to provide sports physicals at a discounted rate.

From now through July 31, 2020, Special Olympics athletes will be able to present a voucher at any MinuteClinic location in CVS Pharmacy or Target and receive a sport physical at the discounted rate of $49, no appointment necessary.Local state organizations may have alternate arrangements.

This promotion provides all Special Olympics athletes with access to this necessary care regardless of their insurance status or whether they have a primary care provider.

Easy-to-Access, Lower-Cost Care

Athletes aren’t the only ones who benefit from the type of proactive care that MinuteClinic offers. With 1,100 locations in 33 states and Washington, D.C., patients have access to a wide range of services at MinuteClinic, including wellness screenings, vaccinations, and chronic condition monitoring.

And when a minor illness or injury does arise, MinuteClinic’s nurse practitioners and physician assistants can often provide care for those conditions as well, including earaches, sprains, skin conditions such as rashes or poison ivy, sore throats and infections of the respiratory system or urinary tract.

At CVS Health, we’re committed to ensuring that patients have access to the quality, affordable care that will keep them in their best health and at the top of their game.

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

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Expanding MinuteClinic care to veterans nationwide

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Support for our country’s veterans and members of the military is central to the work we do at CVS Health, whether it’s through our Workforce programs or our efforts to connect this population with easily accessible, high-quality care.

Since 2016, through a partnership with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), CVS Health has provided health care services to more than 4,000 veterans at select MinuteClinic locations.

Now, through the enactment of the VA MISSION Act, we have been able to expand that care to all of our 1,100 MinuteClinic locations nationwide.

“Our participation in the MISSION Act will give deserving veterans across the country greater access to quality health care when and where they need it while ensuring they are still linked into the Veterans Health Administration,” said Sharon Vitti, President of MinuteClinic. “We’re proud to be able to support the VA on such a meaningful and impactful program.”

Care for veterans through the MISSION Act

Under the MISSION Act, veterans can now access urgent care and walk-in medical services under their VA benefits without pre-authorization. Veterans who meet certain eligibility criteria can receive care at any MinuteClinic location, including treatment for minor illnesses, minor injuries and skin conditions. Following the visit, MinuteClinic is able to make the full record of medical services provided available to the VA with the patient’s consent.

The expansion builds upon our previous pilot programs with the VA, which gave veterans the option to receive care at MinuteClinic locations in Corpus Christi, Texas; Palo Alto and Santa Clarita, California; and Phoenix, Arizona.

Our history of support for veterans

Our support of the MISSION Act is one example of the many ways we stand with veterans, active military and their families.

We have several Workforce Initiatives programs dedicated to recruiting, hiring, training and retaining veterans to build a pipeline of workforce talent. Since 2015, CVS Health has hired almost 15,000 people with military experience and more than 5,000 military spouses.

In addition, we provide charitable support to military and veteran-focused organizations, including the National Guard, Operation Reinvent and the USO. And colleagues can connect through the CVS Health Colleague Resource Group BRAVE, which is comprised of nearly 1,400 members with a passion to serve those who have served our country.

We were recently recognized for our efforts to support veterans and military members.

In May, Military Times named CVS Health to its 2019 list of best companies for veterans seeking a civilian job.

And four CVS Health managers were recently honored with 2019 Patriot Awards from the Rhode Island Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (RI ESGR) for their support of three colleagues serving in the National Guard and Reserve.

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Diverse Supplier Spotlight: Diamond Contractors

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Lori Perry, CEO and owner of Diamond Contractors.
Lori Perry, CEO and owner of Diamond Contractors.

Our Supplier Diversity program works to integrate products and services from small and diverse businesses into our procurement processes.

These partnerships help us ensure that our products and services evolve to meet the needs of our customers, while also contributing to the economic growth of communities across the country.

In 2018, our spending with small and diverse businesses — including 398 owned by women and 373 owned by minorities — totaled $2.2 billion.

One of those businesses is Kansas City-based Diamond Contractors, a family-owned company that has been working with CVS Health since 2007. Here, owner and CEO Lori Perry shares what it’s been like to be part of our Supplier Diversity program.

What specific services do you provide to CVS Health?
Diamond Contractors is a general contractor, licensed and working for CVS Health in 45 states. We have built ground-up stores, but our niche is remodels of existing stores and roll-out programs. Those remodels have included a lot of ADA sitework, pharmacy expansions and multiple other special remodeling projects.

On average, we complete around 100 projects a year for CVS Health, doing as many as 200 remodels annually when we are involved in special roll-out programs such as SmileDirectClub, BeautyIRL, HealthHUB or MinuteClinic.

How has the partnership with CVS Health been beneficial to your business?
CVS Health is our main client, and the relationship has been enormously beneficial to our business. I started Diamond Contractors in a bedroom in my home 25 years ago and working for CVS Health has enabled us to buy a 15,000 square-foot building and warehouse that has been our base of operations for the last five years.

How has working with CVS Health benefited the communities you serve?
We employ 22 people in our Kansas City office and, depending upon the time of year, we employ anywhere from 20 to 60 field personnel. Working in 45 states, our association with CVS Health has brought economic opportunities to hundreds of local subcontractors in those areas over the past 12 years.

Has working with CVS Health changed the way you do business?
Working with CVS Health has allowed us to grow our business substantially. We now have a project management team, an estimating team, an accounting team and a subcontractor procurement department — in addition to our hard-working field team. We have put many more procedures and programs in place to stay up to date with our workload from CVS Health and other clients. In addition, our partnership with CVS Health has given us opportunities to work with other national clients.

We’re deeply grateful for our partnership with CVS Health. It has made a hugely positive impact on our growth and the chance to do business with other diverse suppliers.

Read about the work we do with Loop Capital, one of our other Diverse Suppliers.

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CVS Health Among Top Companies for Disability Inclusion

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2019 DEI ‘Best Place to Work for Disability Inclusion’ logo.

CVS Health has earned a top score on the 2019 Disability Equality Index (DEI). This is the third year in a row that CVS Health has been given a score of 100 on the DEI, which is based on several criteria, including culture and leadership; enterprise-wide access and supplier diversity. Top-scoring companies earn the distinction of being recognized as a “Best Place to Work for Disability Inclusion.”

This is the fourth consecutive year that Aetna, a CVS Health business, has made the list.

Supporting Individuals with Disabilities in Our Workforce

At CVS Health, we understand the value of a diverse workforce and we have a number of programs in place to ensure that we are actively attracting, training, hiring and retaining individuals from many demographics, including those with disabilities.

Our Abilities in Abundance program, led by our Workforce Initiatives team, engages individuals with disabilities to provide job coaching and employment opportunities.

Through partnerships with community organizations nationwide, we’ve opened several training centers where individuals with disabilities can learn skills necessary for careers in retail environments, including most recently, the new Workforce Innovation and Talent Center, which opened in Cleveland, Ohio, in partnership with the Center for Children and Families.

Similarly, we operate several Regional Learning Centers, where we collaborate with government agencies, community organizations, and educational institutions to create job training programs that are often designed for individuals with disabilities.

And our Abilities Colleague Resource Group (CRG) helps to increase awareness of the important role that customers and colleagues with disabilities play in our workforce, workplace and marketplace by taking action to foster, at all levels of CVS Health, an inclusive, supportive environment.

A Comprehensive Assessment of Disability Inclusion

Launched in 2015 as a joint initiative of Disability:IN and the American Association of People with Disabilities, the DEI is recognized as the most comprehensive disability inclusion assessment tool allowing businesses to self-report their disability policies and practices.

180 companies from a diverse range of industries, including health care, technology and financial services, participated in the 2019 DEI. Of those, 113 were Fortune 500 companies.

In total, the participating DEI companies represent a workforce of more than 8.6 million, with 3.7 percent of employees identifying as having a disability.

2019 DEI ‘Best Place to Work for Disability Inclusion’ logo.
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