COVID-19: Vaccine information

Learn more about the COVID-19 vaccination, including who will be getting it first once the vaccines are FDA-authorized, and answers to many other questions you might have.

COVID-19: We’re with you on this journey

From testing to providing fact-based information, we have been beside you as a trusted resource. In our new role as a leading provider of COVID-19 vaccinations, you can continue to count on us.

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Throughout the pandemic, we have made COVID-19 testing accessible to thousands of communities nationwide and we stand ready to help you get vaccinated safely. Based on guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), front-line health care workers and residents and staff of long-term care (LTC) facilities will be the first to receive the vaccine and we have begun administering COVID-19 vaccinations at LTC facilities. 

We have unmatched experience safely and effectively administering vaccinations. In 2020, we administered nearly 20 million non-COVID-19 vaccinations – this includes more than double the number of flu shots given in 2019. 

We have also made significant investments in our cold chain distribution capabilities in preparation for the COVID-19 vaccines and our CVS Pharmacy locations are equipped to safely store the vaccines. 

Most importantly, our team of experienced health care professionals — including pharmacists, trained pharmacy technicians, and nurses — are skilled at administering vaccinations and look forward to playing a key role in helping vaccinate you when the time is right. 

FAQs about the COVID-19 vaccine

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How were the vaccines created so quickly? Are they safe?
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Long-term care residents and staff will be at the front of the line

More than 40,000 long-term care facilities across all 50 states, Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico have selected CVS Health to provide COVID-19 vaccines to residents and staff during the first wave of vaccinations. 

Working closely with federal and state health officials and LTC facility administrators, residents and staff began receiving the vaccine from CVS Health frontline clinical staff within days of FDA authorization.

The population in long-term care facilities is one our clinical team works with regularly. Each year, we operate seasonal flu vaccination clinics on-site at thousands of assisted living facilities. And we’ve also been providing COVID-19 testing services in skilled nursing facilities throughout the pandemic. 

Read our FAQs for more information on our plans to administer the COVID-19 vaccine to long-term care facilities.

In 2021, COVID-19 vaccines will be in all our stores

We’re following federal and state guidelines that prioritize vulnerable populations, including those at long-term care facilities, to be among the first to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. 

Once vaccines are available to the general public, anticipated to be in early 2021, we will begin offering them in our nearly 10,000 CVS Pharmacy locations nationwide. We expect to be able to administer as many as 20-25 million shots per month.

Please note, the COVID-19 vaccine is not currently available at CVS locations.  We will keep you informed about the rollout to our pharmacies.

When that time comes, booking an appointment for your vaccination will be simple and seamless. The same digital experience that we created for COVID-19 testing and flu vaccinations will be available to schedule COVID-19 vaccinations, so that you can easily book an appointment and, depending on the vaccine type, the required booster dose as well. 

Read our FAQs for more information on COVID-19 vaccines in CVS Pharmacy.

Recent COVID-19 vaccine news

A MinuteClinic practitioner applies a band-aid after administering a vaccination to a patient, wearing a face mask.

U.S. COVID-19 Vaccine Program

More information on the U.S. COVID-19 Vaccine Program, including safety information and information on specific vaccines, can be found on the Centers for Disease Control’s COVID-19 vaccines page.

Visit the Centers for Disease Control’s website